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Short Film LOVE shows why Neurodiversity in Media is So Vital

Editors note: the writer of this piece was given the tickets for free, this did not affect their review.


“One day he said to me, he could never imagine himself to be a lead in a film.”

LOVE is a short film starring Jules Robertson, an autistic man playing Oscar – but the production team says it is a film about unrequited love from his perspective, rather than a film about autism itself.

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The Amazing Edie Eckhart is Amazing For Cerebral Palsy – Book Review

Editors’ Note: This wonderful review of The Amazing Edie Eckhart by Rosie Jones came from 13-year-old Susie, who has cerebral palsy (with help from her Mum). It may contain spoilers for some parts of the story. She was sent a free copy of the book for the purposes of this review. She has been paid the same as all of our contributors, and has promised to spend her entire fee on sweets.


I really like this book because it is relatable – having cerebral palsy as well. It is relatable because there are a few cerebral palsy-related occurrences that happen that I have experienced. One thing that I remember is when Edie calls it ‘Terrible Palsy’ which I have called it before. I feel like Edie is very moving because she doesn’t hold back because of her cerebral palsy.    

The character of Edie is very inspirational because she joined a theatre club, got a lead role, and then did something as ambitious as to change the lead character’s gender. Mr. Murphy is a character that I think is good for Edie because he motivates her a lot when the performance of a Christmas Carol is nearing. 

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all Essays review

Tasty and Achievable Meals for Low Energy Days – Cookfulness by Ian Taverner

Cookfulness was kindly sent to The Unwritten to review, this has not influenced the views of the reviewer.


I feel I should start this review by saying I love cookbooks. My cookbook shelf is overflowing with books of all kinds. That said, as much as my crammed bookshelf declares my love of food and cooking, it doesn’t tell the whole story. 

I love to cook, but being disabled and neurodivergent, cooking a satisfying, nutritious, and tasty meal for me and my husband isn’t always the easiest thing to accomplish. So when I was asked to review Cookfulness, a book aimed at people with chronic pain, mobility issues, and mental health issues, it seemed like a match made in heaven.

The first thing I do with any new cookbook is sit down and eagerly flick through the recipes in anticipation of what I want to make first. I noticed was there are no pictures of the completed dishes, as someone who can find visualising things difficult, this is a bit of a shame. Likewise, there isn’t an index, which is a supremely useful feature to have when you’ve got a random ingredient and no idea what to make with it.